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Aquatic Resources and Development (2004-2007)

This project allows a format for fresh thinking in this area of sustainable use of aquatic biodiversity, and encompasses several novel initiatives with new approaches to the task of bringing aquatic biodiversity issues into our culture, society, and policies.

As the demand for saltwater and freshwater resources increases, so do the strains upon the ecosystems that sustain them. Sustainable fisheries rest upon aquatic biodiversity, but conservation of that biodiversity has always been a "hard sell," lagging behind the strides made for terrestrial plants and animals. It now seems most feasible in a people context - that is, when biodiversity is associated with livelihoods.

The Aquatic Resources and Development project was created as an outgrowth of the position paper SUSTAINABLE USE OF AQUATIC BIODIVERSITY: Key Issues and Opportunities for IDRC written by WFT in 2002. It allows a format for fresh thinking in this area, and encompasses several novel initiatives with new approaches to the task of bringing aquatic biodiversity issues into our culture, society, and policies.

The Sink or Swim roundtable discussions, held September 26 & 27, 2006 in Victoria, BC, were aimed at outlining models, key principles, and research findings that can form the foundation of effective aquatic conservation communication initiatives - initiatives that will lead to meaningful engagement among key audiences.

Arte Chico, another project initiative, attempted to mobilize the communicative power of artists to raise community awareness of conservation issues.

Centered in Brazil, Arte Chico celebrated the art and culture of the San Francisco river, bringing biodiversity into popular culture and making grass roots linkages within the community. The first phase of the project was a groundbreaking survey of the rich artistic resources in the middle portion of the river; the final report of this sociological study will form the basis for the next phase, which involved the creation of a local organization to raise funds from government and private sources.

With support from the International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

 

Additional Resources:

FINAL REPORT

SINK OR SWIM ARTICLE- DEVIN BARTLEY (FAO AQUACULTURE NEWSLETTER, 36, DECEMBER 2006)