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Browse the links on the right for a chronological list of our past projects in South America and around the world.

Cuenca-del-Amazonas1


 

"Gente da Maré (People of the Tides) Project" (2008-2010)

In 2015, Gente de Maré was awarded second place for a Social Technology in the category of Women at the Premio Banco de Technologia Social 2015 is Brasil. 

Coastal communities of northeastern Brazil are some of the most disadvantaged in the country. The lower social classes in these areas have traditionally relied on artisanal fisheries of coastal marine resources, including fish, shellfish, and algae. Fishing of bivalve molluscs is an important economic activity in many coastal communities of northeastern Brazil. However, decaves of uncontrolled and unplanned collection has exhausted natural stocks. In addition, pollution from urban development is seriously contaminating remaining clam beds - resulting in serious environmental and socio-economic consequences. 

WFT and our partners, the Center for Global Studies at the University of Victoria, SEAP - Brazil, and a variety of others, initiated the "People of the Tides" project through CIDA's Brazil-Canada Knowledge Exchange for Equity Promotion (KEEP). This project, within the KEEP framework, promoted equity and citizenship through the development of sustainably managed coastal resources in traditional communities of the northeast coast of Brazil.

The project actions were based on six key strategies aimed at improving the living conditions and income of fisherwomen in Northeastern Brazil:

(1) strengthening the role of community leaders;

(2) strengthening of institutional coordination of shellfish management and aquaculture;

(3) community exchanges;

(4) training of persons working for the extension activities via courses and workshops;

(5) development of technology for shellfish cultivation and

(6) studies on population ecology and fisheries management of bivalves. 

The Gente de Maré project promoted equity and citizenship through the development of sustainably managed coastal resources in traditional communities of the northeast coast of Brazil - some of the most disadvantaged in the country. The project was developed to address the following issues related to shellfish management in Northeastern Brazil: gender equality, health at work, natural resource management, cultivation and seed production, processing and health of seafood, and value chains and arrangements production. More than 1,300 women from Rio Grande do Norte, Paraiba, Pernambuca, and Bahia were involved in this project. 

 

OUR PARTNERS

The Special Secretary for Aquaculture and Fisheries of the Presidency of the Republic

Marine Mollusk Laboratory

Federal University of Catarina

Agricultural Research and Extension Company of Santa Catarina

Sustainable Mariculture Laboratory

Rural Federal University of Pernambuco

Bahia Pesca, Institute of Biology

Federal University of Bahia


 


 

Brazil Inland Fisheries: Sustainable Livelihoods and Conservation (2003-2007)

Focusing on the northeast and central-west portions of the country, this project’s overall aim was to create and implement a model for sustainable socio-environmental river management.

In January 2003, building on the success of our Brazil Migratory Fish Conservation project, World Fisheries Trust began an expanded four years project, which places greater emphasis on the social side of Brazilian inland fisheries, including community-based management.

The project focused on the northeast and central-west portions of the country in the basin of the Sao Francisco River, and its overall aim was to create and implement a model for sustainable socio-environmental river management. The project balanced the transfer of "hard" fisheries technologies with an equal social component, and was divided into six sub-projects and cross-cutting themes:

- Building fishing community capacity for co-management

- Building sustainable livelihoods in fishing communities

- Transferring technologies to secure and build the resource

- Developing policies for sustainable fishing and community participation in management

- Creating awareness of Brazilian river fisheries and ecosystems

- Creating opportunities for youth and families

 

 

PROJECT REPORTS

ENGLISH

PORTUGUESE PT I

PORTUGUESE PT II

PORTUGUESE PT III

 

 

OUR PARTNERS

Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar)

UFSCar - Pro-rectorship of Extension

UFSCar - Departamento de Genética

UFSCar - Núcleo de Pesquisa e Documentação do Departamento de Ciências Socias

Federação dos Pescadores Artesenais Minas Gerais

Prefeitura Municipal de Três Marias

Companhia Energética de Minas Gerais

Instituto Estadual de Florestas

Minas Gerais

Ministerio do Meio Ambiente: Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e Amazonas Leal

Polícia Militar - Minas Gerais,

Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais

Secretaria Especial de Aquiculture e Pesca

Votorantim Metais - Três Marias

Canadian International Development Agency

International Development Research Centre

 


 

Migratory Fishes of South America: Biology, Fisheries and Conservation Status (2003)

Edited by Joachim Carolsfield, Brian Harvey, Carmen Ross, and Anton Baer

Co-published by World Fisheries Trust, IDRC and World Bank - 2004

ISBN 1-55250-114-0

Paperback 380 pp.

This book represents the first collection of the work of local scientific experts on fish species that migrate within the great rivers of South America.

Fish species that migrate within the great rivers of South America support important local fisheries but are little known outside their native range. This book is the first collection of the work of local scientific experts on these remarkable fish.

The authors cover the Upper Paraná, Paraguay-Paraná, Uruguay and São Francisco basins in Brazil, as well as the Brazilian and Colombian Amazon. They discuss not only the principal migratory species and their fascinating relationship with the water cycle in the rivers and wetlands, but also the fisheries they support, and their often precarious conservation status.

 

 ABSTRACT

Fish species that migrate within the great rivers of South America support important local fisheries but are little known outside their native range. This book, written specially for the World Bank and the International Development Research Centre, represents the first collection of the work of local scientific experts on these remarkable fish. The authors cover the Upper Paraná, Paraguay-Paraná, Uruguay and São Francisco basins in Brazil, as well as the Brazilian and Colombian Amazon. They discuss not only the principal migratory species and their fascinating relationship with the water cycle in the rivers and wetlands, but also the fisheries they support, and their often precarious conservation status

 

FULL TEXT HERE

 

OUR PARTNERS

International Development Research Centre

World Bank


 

Brazil Migratory Fish Conservation (1999-2001)

A three-year project to promote the conservation and awareness of migratory fish species in four major river basins in Brazil, with the aim of ensuring the preservation - and thus permitting the utilization - of native Brazilian fish genetic diversity.

 

Brazilian rivers are home to a spectacular variety of large migratory fish species of high economic and social value. These species make long annual journeys upriver to spawn, but their biology and distribution are not well known.

Like so much of the world's freshwater species, many of these migratory fish have been declining in numbers and diversity for decades. As with salmon in North America, the reasons for the decline in South American migratory fish stocks are complex. They include overfishing, pollution, loss of habitat, deforestation and the construction of dams that block migration routes.

Together with a network of Brazilian and Canadian partners, WFT carried out a three-year project to promote the conservation and awareness of migratory fish species in four major river basins in Brazil. The project's goal, "to ensure the preservation, and thus permit the utilization, of native Brazilian fish genetic diversity", was accomplished though training, technology development, networking and public awareness in both Canada and Brazil.

PROJECT SUMMARY

 

ORIGINAL BRAZILIAN PARTNERS

Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul

Companhia Energética de Minas Gerais

Centrais Eléctricas do Sul do Brasil S.A.

Central Eléctrica de Furnas

Companhia de Desenvolvimento do Vale do São Francisco

Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Renováveis Fundação Biodiversitas

ORIGINAL CANADIAN PARTNERS

Canadian International Development Agency

Seastar Biotech Inc.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

BRAZILIAN NETWORK PARTNERS

Brazilian institutions that became part of the network associated with the project and/or benefited from project activities, beyond the original partners, include:

Agencia Nacional de Energia Eletrica

Associação Mineira de Aquicultura

Companhia de Saneamento do Distrito Federal, Brasília

Centro de Apoio ao Pescador (Três Marias, MG)

Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Peixes Tropicais

Empresa Brasileiro de Pesquisa Agropecuario

Fundação ZooBotanica de Belo Horizonte

Instituto Estadual de Florestas (Minas Gerais)

ITAIPU Binacional

Ministerio do Meio Ambiente

Piscicultura Panama Ltda. (Santa Caterina)

Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Minas

Secretaria de Meio Ambiente e Desenvolvimento (Minas Gerais)

Departamentos de Pesca e Servico de Inspeção de Pescado e Derivados / Ministerio de Agricultura e do Abastecimento (Brasilia)

Secretaria de Recursos Hídricos (Brasilia)

Universidade Estadual de São Paulo

Universidade do Vale de Sinos (Rio Grande do Sul)

Universidade Federal de Lavras (Minas Gerais)

Universidade do Oeste de Santa Caterina

Universidade de São Paulo 

NORTH AMERICAN NETWORK PARTNERS

Canadian and North American institutions that participated in project activities, beyond those initially proposed:

BC Hydro

BC Ministry of Environment

BC Ministry of Agriculture and Lands

BC Ministry of Forests and Range

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Future SEA Technologies Inc.

International Development Research Centre

LGL Ltd. Environmental Research Associates

LOTEK Wireless Inc.

Memorial University

Northwest Marine Technology Inc.

Sea Spring Salmon Farms Ltd.

Texas Parks and Wildlife

Vancouver Aquarium

Western Canada's Genetic Centre

 

 


 

Global Citizenship in Fisheries and Aquaculture (2008)

This project informs and engages Canadian middle school students on fisheries and aquaculture in select developing countries, how these relate to everyday life in these countries, and how Canadian activities are contributing to Millennium Development Goals through these activities.

This project was initiated in 2008 by World Fisheries Trust and associates, with funding provided by the Government of Canada through the Canadian International Development Agency and their project "Global Classroom Initiative".

The first eight lesson plans developed focus on communities in Mozambique and include resource materials and appropriate links. They have an approach that engages students by highlighting personal lives with relevant reference to Canadians' own everyday lives or experiences.

With support from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)

 

Additional Resources:

LESSON PLANS


 

5th International Fisheries Observer Conference (2007)

This conference brought together broad representation from the international fisheries community to address key issues concerning fisheries observer programs, emerging fisheries monitoring technologies, and other approaches for fishery dependent data collection.

Improving the sustainability of fisheries is necessary to ensure continued livelihoods around the globe. Monitoring the quantity and type of fish caught, and the manner in which fishing occurs is essential to sustainable management. The International Fisheries Observer Conference series has, over a number of years, guided the development of best practices for fishery monitoring programs and promoted their implementation globally.

The 5th International Fisheries Observer Conference was held at the Victoria Conference Centre, Victoria, BC, on May 15th to 18th, 2007. The conference brought together broad representation from the international fisheries community to address key issues concerning fisheries observer programs, emerging fisheries monitoring technologies, and other approaches for fishery dependent data collection.

The conference organizers received funding from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) Conference Secretariat and WFT was contracted to act as the Developing Country Liaison for the conference and oversee all issues pertaining to involvement of the developing country delegation.

Approximately 22 delegates were invited to participate in the conference, representing 19 developing countries, including Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ghana, Guatemala, India, Kenya, Namibia, Nigeria, Panama, Peru, the Philippines, Russia, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

The conference was managed and hosted by Archipelago Marine Research Ltd. with Howard McElderry acting as the conference Chairman.

With support from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)


 

Aquatic Resources and Development (2004-2007)

This project allows a format for fresh thinking in this area of sustainable use of aquatic biodiversity, and encompasses several novel initiatives with new approaches to the task of bringing aquatic biodiversity issues into our culture, society, and policies.

As the demand for saltwater and freshwater resources increases, so do the strains upon the ecosystems that sustain them. Sustainable fisheries rest upon aquatic biodiversity, but conservation of that biodiversity has always been a "hard sell," lagging behind the strides made for terrestrial plants and animals. It now seems most feasible in a people context - that is, when biodiversity is associated with livelihoods.

The Aquatic Resources and Development project was created as an outgrowth of the position paper SUSTAINABLE USE OF AQUATIC BIODIVERSITY: Key Issues and Opportunities for IDRC written by WFT in 2002. It allows a format for fresh thinking in this area, and encompasses several novel initiatives with new approaches to the task of bringing aquatic biodiversity issues into our culture, society, and policies.

The Sink or Swim roundtable discussions, held September 26 & 27, 2006 in Victoria, BC, were aimed at outlining models, key principles, and research findings that can form the foundation of effective aquatic conservation communication initiatives - initiatives that will lead to meaningful engagement among key audiences.

Arte Chico, another project initiative, attempted to mobilize the communicative power of artists to raise community awareness of conservation issues.

Centered in Brazil, Arte Chico celebrated the art and culture of the San Francisco river, bringing biodiversity into popular culture and making grass roots linkages within the community. The first phase of the project was a groundbreaking survey of the rich artistic resources in the middle portion of the river; the final report of this sociological study will form the basis for the next phase, which involved the creation of a local organization to raise funds from government and private sources.

With support from the International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

 

Additional Resources:

FINAL REPORT

SINK OR SWIM ARTICLE- DEVIN BARTLEY (FAO AQUACULTURE NEWSLETTER, 36, DECEMBER 2006)


 

Expert Workshop on Comparative Environmental Costs of Aquaculture (2006)

WFT convened an international workshop to bring together international experts on aquaculture development, ecology, environmental economics, and environmental impact and energy analysis to discuss a variety environmental accounting systems.

At the request of FAO’s Sub-Committee on Aquaculture, and with the support of the FAO Fisheries Department and the Vancouver Aquarium, WFT convened an international workshop titled Study and Analysis on Environmental Costs of Aquaculture Production in Comparison with Other Food Production Sectors in Vancouver in April 2006.

The workshop brought together international experts on aquaculture development, ecology, environmental economics, and environmental impact and energy analysis to discuss a variety environmental accounting systems, such as Energy and Ecological Footprint Analysis, Life Cycle Assessment and Material Flows Accounting. As a result, FAO was provided with advice on how to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of these accounting systems and how to deal with the subject in the future.

With support from FAO of the United Nations

 

Additional Resources:

WORKSHOP ARTICLE- DEVIN BARTLEY (AQUACULTURE NEWSLETTER, 35, JUNE 2006)


Expert Workshop on Status and Trends in Aquatic Genetic Resources (2006)

This workshop brought together a small group of internationally recognized experts in the fields of aquaculture, capture fisheries, molecular genetics, international development, and aquatic conservation.

At the request of the FAO Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (CGRFA) to prepare a document on the status of aquatic resources, WFT and the Fishery Resources Division of FAO convened a second international workshop in 2006. The workshop, titled Status and Trends in Aquatic Genetic Resources: a Basis for International Policy, was held May 8th to 10th, in Victoria, British Columbia.

The workshop brought together a small group of internationally recognized experts in the fields of aquaculture, capture fisheries, molecular genetics, international development, and aquatic conservation. During the workshop the experts identified key policy issues, priorities and implications for the international development community, recommended the creation of technical guidelines and identified areas of work that FAO could pursue to improve information, build capacity, create policy instruments and raise awareness and education.

In direct follow up to this workshop, and as part of our Aquatic Resources and Development project (Funded by IDRC), WFT held a workshop titled 'Sink or Swim' Roundtable on Aquatic Genetic Resources in Victoria, BC, September 26th & 27th, 2006 to raise the profile of genetic resources for fisheries and aquaculture.

With support from FAO of the United Nations

 

Additional Resources:

WORKSHOP ARTICLE- DEVIN BARTLEY (AQUACULTURE NEWSLETTER, 35, JUNE 2006)

 


Blue Gold: Access to Aquatic Genetic Resources in Indigenous and Local Communities (2003)

This book documents the results of a three-year study to gather experiences with fish genetic resources, provide information on the issues, and help communities create their own policies for access to fish genetic resources in their area.

One of the most difficult issues faced by nations implementing the Convention on Biological Diversity is how to ensure that benefits arising from biodiversity are shared with those who provided access in the first place. In many cases, access has been provided by local and indigenous communities.

A lot of attention has been paid to benefit sharing for plant genetic resources such as seeds or medicinal plants. The problem of aquatic genetic resources has been almost completely overlooked - yet more and more communities are becoming recognized as sources of this potentially valuable commodity.

WFT worked with communities around the world to gather experiences with fish genetic resources, provide information on the issues, and help communities create their own policies for access to fish genetic resources in their area. The results of the three-year study was published in the book Blue Genes: Sharing and Conserving the World's Aquatic Biodiversity.

The book is available for purchase from the following sources:

With support from the International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

 


Biodiversity Effects of Mariculture (2002)

WFT prepared a review paper on the biodiversity effects of mariculture for the Ad Hoc Technical Expert Group on Mariculture.

Mariculture is the farming and husbandry of marine plants and animals in brackishwater or marine environments. While mariculture output is still dwarfed by the tonnage of farmed freshwater organisms, it is growing explosively and its practices have important implications for marine biodiversity, especially in light of a trend toward the culture of high-value carnivorous species.

Mariculture practices have many effects on biodiversity, ranging from the genetic effects of large-scale deliberate release of farmed fish into the wild to the effects on primary productivity that filter down through the food chain.

WFT prepared a review paper as a background document for the Ad Hoc Technical Expert Group on Mariculture, established by the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity.

The paper helped the expert group evaluate the state of scientific and technical knowledge on the effects of mariculture on marine and coastal biodiversity, and provide guidance on criteria, methods and techniques that avoid the adverse effects of mariculture and stock enhancement on marine and coastal biological diversity.

With support from Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity

 

Additional Resources:

FINAL REPORT ON CBD WEBSITE


The Blue Millenium Project: Managing Fisheries for Biodiversity (2001)

The Blue Millennium Project was created to help national biodiversity planners come to grips with fisheries issues.

WFT surveyed progress in 52 countries on dealing with fisheries issues in biodiversity planning; prepared a "Fisheries Primer" for planners, and convened an international workshop on fisheries and biodiversity.

The workshop Blue Millennium: Managing Global Fisheries for Biodiversity, was held in Victoria, B.C. June 25-27, 2001, and brought together authors of fisheries management case studies from around the world, including Canada, Namibia, Philippines, Brazil, Laos, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Barbados, Uganda and New Zealand.

The workshop represented the first opportunity for global fisheries scientists and management professionals to meet and review actual national experiences in incorporating biodiversity considerations into the fisheries sector.

With support from the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

 

Additional Resources:

REPORT AND CASE STUDIES (coming soon)


Action Before Extinction: an International Workshop on Fish Genetic Conservation (1998)

WFT brought together representatives of fish genetic conservation programs around the world to discuss techniques and policies.

Genetic conservation means saving genetic variability before it disappears. A number of nations have begun fish genetic conservation programs, and more are being planned.

With Action Before Extinction, WFT brought representatives of these programs together for the first time, to discuss techniques and policies. The workshop was held in February 1998, in Vancouver, and was attended by delegates from fifteen countries, including Canada.

Order the book.

With support from: Alcan Aluminum Ltd., BC Hydro, BC Ministry of Fisheries, Environment Canada, Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), Creative Salmon Co., Fisheries and Oceans Canada, International Development Research Centre (IDRC), and the Robert Schad Foundation.

 

Additional Resources:

TABLE OF CONTENTS AND EXCERPTS FROM THE CONFERENCE (coming soon)

Coastal communities of northeastern Brazil are some of the most disadvantaged in the country. The lower social classes in these areas have traditionally relied on artisanal fisheries of coastal marine resources, including fish, shellfish, and algae. Fishing of bivalve molluscs is an important economic activity in many coastal communities of northeastern Brazil. However, decades of uncontrolled and unplanned collection has exhausted natural stocks. In addition, pollution from urban development is seriously contaminating remaining clam beds - resulting in serious environmental and socio-economic consequences. 

 

  • Building fishing community capacity for co-management
  • Building sustainable livelihoods in fishing communities
  • Transferring technologies to secure and build the resource
  • Developing policies for sustainable fishing and community participation in management
  • Creating awareness of Brazilian river fisheries and ecosystems
  • Creating opportunities for youth and families

Brazil Migratory Fish Conservation (1999-2001)

A three-year project to promote the conservation and awareness of migratory fish species in four major river basins in Brazil, with the aim of ensuring the preservation - and thus permitting the utilization - of native Brazilian fish genetic diversity.

Brazilian rivers are home to a spectacular variety of large migratory fish species of high economic and social value. These species make long annual journeys upriver to spawn, but their biology and distribution are not well known.

Like so much of the world's freshwater species, many of these migratory fish have been declining in numbers and diversity for decades. As with salmon in North America, the reasons for the decline in South American migratory fish stocks are complex. They include overfishing, pollution, loss of habitat, deforestation and the construction of dams that block migration routes.

Together with a network of Brazilian and Canadian partners, WFT carried out a three-year project to promote the conservation and awareness of migratory fish species in four major river basins in Brazil. The project's goal, "to ensure the preservation, and thus permit the utilization, of native Brazilian fish genetic diversity", was accomplished though training, technology development, networking and public awareness in both Canada and Brazil.

PROJECT SUMMARY

ORIGINAL BRAZILIAN PARTNERS

Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul

Companhia Energética de Minas Gerais

Centrais Eléctricas do Sul do Brasil S.A.

Central Eléctrica de Furnas

Companhia de Desenvolvimento do Vale do São Francisco

Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Renováveis Fundação Biodiversitas

ORIGINAL CANADIAN PARTNERS

Canadian International Development Agency

Seastar Biotech Inc.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

BRAZILIAN NETWORK PARTNERS

Brazilian institutions that became part of the network associated with the project and/or benefited from project activities, beyond the original partners, include:

Agencia Nacional de Energia Eletrica

Associação Mineira de Aquicultura

Companhia de Saneamento do Distrito Federal, Brasília

Centro de Apoio ao Pescador (Três Marias, MG)

Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Peixes Tropicais

Empresa Brasileiro de Pesquisa Agropecuario

Fundação ZooBotanica de Belo Horizonte

Instituto Estadual de Florestas (Minas Gerais)

ITAIPU Binacional

Ministerio do Meio Ambiente

Piscicultura Panama Ltda. (Santa Caterina)

Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Minas

Secretaria de Meio Ambiente e Desenvolvimento (Minas Gerais)

Departamentos de Pesca e Servico de Inspeção de Pescado e Derivados / Ministerio de Agricultura e do Abastecimento (Brasilia)

Secretaria de Recursos Hídricos (Brasilia)

Universidade Estadual de São Paulo

Universidade do Vale de Sinos (Rio Grande do Sul)

Universidade Federal de Lavras (Minas Gerais)

Universidade do Oeste de Santa Caterina

Universidade de São Paulo 

NORTH AMERICAN NETWORK PARTNERS

Canadian and North American institutions that participated in project activities, beyond those initially proposed:

BC Hydro

BC Ministry of Environment

BC Ministry of Agriculture and Lands

BC Ministry of Forests and Range

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Future SEA Technologies Inc.

International Development Research Centre

LGL Ltd. Environmental Research Associates

LOTEK Wireless Inc.

Memorial University

Northwest Marine Technology Inc.

Sea Spring Salmon Farms Ltd.

Texas Parks and Wildlife

Vancouver Aquarium

WestGen - Western Canada's Genetic Centre